Hello and Snowdrops!

A lot has happened since my last post, it was autumn and now it’s spring! I’ve moved house, been on work-related chainsaw, tractor and telehandler training courses, taken two RHS exams, spent a week in Scotland, attended a Mediterranean Plants and Gardens lecture at the Chelsea Physic Garden, finishing final year reports for my PGG diploma as well as preparing for a trip to Thailand which starts in 5 days time. Time really does fly when you’re having a good time!

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Snowdrop Grove

Regarding Thailand I will be spending three weeks in the north and north east of the country, studying orchids in their natural habitat. Thailand is home to over 1,000 different species of orchids, it’s an understatement to say I can’t wait; I was excited to spend 2 weeks in Portugal last year, this trip has taken my enthusiasm to another level!

In between keeping up with life in general I had time after exams to fit in a garden visit to Painswick Rococo in Gloucestershire. I visited last summer, please click here to read my post about it.

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Close-up

It is home to a stunning snowdrop collection, with one of the largest naturalistic plantings of in the country; The largest collections of Galanthus in the garden are:

  • Galanthus nivalis
  • Galanthus nivalis f. pleniflorus ‘Flore Pleno’
  • Galanthus ‘Atkinsii’

Painswick Rococo is in many ways the spiritual home of Galanthus ‘Atkinsii’.  Known as a superior early flowering giant snowdrop G. ‘Atkinsii’ has a trouble history.
James Atkins (1804-1884), a retired nurseryman originally from Northamptonshire, but who was living in one of the estate cottages owned by the family at Painswick.

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Atkins obtained a bulb around 1870, most likely from southern Italy, which he grew and called Galanthus imperati. This name has lead and continues to cause confusion but is was offered by Atkins to the nursery trade as this and sales started on a commercial basis around 1875; this species was highly prized by early snowdrop collectors for its size and beauty.

In 1891 the name Galanthus ‘Atkinsii’ was proposed to clear up confusion and recognise John Atkins as the selector of this particular stock.

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Two year after his introduction a nurseryman from York, James Backhouse, introduced a snowdrop which was to all intense and purpose identical to G. ‘Atkinsii’ but with irregular malformed flowers.

In 1914 E. A. Bowles called this G. ‘Atkinsii’ James Backhouse instead, recognising it as a distinct form.  One of the great mysteries here at Painswick is the appearance of G. ‘James Backhouse’ growing in sizable clumps without ever having been purchased by the Trust or indeed the family before it. . .

I enjoyed the snowdrop collection tremendously, it was a beautiful sunny day when I visited; the sun shining on a carpet of white heads in the woodland looked as magical, if not more so, than snow.

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Tree sculpture

A fantastic work of art had been carved out of a beech tree stump, if only I could create sculptures like this with my chainsaw!

This will be my last post for a while, it’s a little in advance but I wish all of my readers a very happy Easter – roll on spring! 😀

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